Michael Jones

the great retention

How much talent will you lose in ‘The Great Resignation’? – Part 2

The Great Retention

The pandemic has presented many employees with the opportunity to reflect on what is important to us, to our families, and to our happiness. Hybrid work is here to stay, and many of us are in the mood to make changes. Companies are warned of a mass exodus of talent – ‘The Great Resignation’.

If you haven’t already, please do read part one of this blog where I discuss how the pandemic changed our attitudes towards our lives and how we want to work. In part two I want to discuss what organisations can do to avoid losing their top talent in ‘The Great Resignation’.

How much talent will you lose in ‘The Great Resignation’? – Part 1

The pandemic has changed our perception of reality

Although it’s now 23 years since it first came out, The Truman Show remains one of my favourite movies. It’s one of those rare films that I can watch over and over. Everything about it works, and if it didn’t, any film with Laura Linney is surely reason enough to do that anyway!

You remember the basic plot, right? Truman Burbank (played by Jim Carey) has spent his entire life as the central character in the world’s most popular reality TV show. He has been in this environment since birth and remains oblivious that every other character in his life is played by an actor. The whole edifice is controlled by a despotic director named Christof (Ed Harris).

As the plot evolves, Truman realises that his entire life is an elaborate construct. The final scene has Truman reaching the physical end of his known world and facing the option of returning to the artificial construct of life as it was. He is encouraged to do so by the “Creator” (Christof). The other option is to move through a doorway to the real unknown world. The movie ends with Truman voicing his signature catch phrase “In case I don’t see ya, good morning, good afternoon and good night!” as he (spoiler alert) steps through the doorway.

I can't do wright for doing wrong

Can I give you some feedback?

Is there really anyone out there who hears those word and thinks “oh goody, yes please”?

If there is, you’re a much better person than me!

Take this example, it was a long time ago – but I still remember it like it was yesterday.

I’d given a sales presentation to a prospective client with Helen, a new Associate who I was mentoring. Despite not being a traditionally qualified ‘sales professional’, I was actually quite good at what I did. I believed passionately in the product that I was selling, and I had my own sales ‘muscle’ that I used to be effective.

Helen, on the other hand, was very much a qualified sales person. She had worked in sales for one market-leading multinational company for the fifteen years since her graduation. She had been on every sales course suggested – and undoubtedly knew her stuff.