HR Management

Find that missing piece - recruitment

Will your job description help you find that missing piece?

The hiring process can be challenging. There are numerous things to take into consideration when you are looking for a new employee: budget, time frame, essential skills and experience, cultural fit. The list goes on.

However, recruitment should be celebrated. After all, if you are expanding your team your company is growing!

One of the first steps when recruiting is to decide on exactly who you are looking for and to create a compelling job description.

Simple enough right? Not necessarily.

The job advert will represent your company and your hiring needs. A well-written job advert – with a focus on the required behavioural characteristics – will attract the right applicants.

If your advert is not clearly targeted, you may have wasted your time, or it may lead to the wrong hire. Hiring mistakes are costly!

PI Behavioral Assessment™; certified in the European Federation of Psychologists

The Predictive Index Behavioral Assessment™ helps clients to decode the core drives of their employees and offers insights into their needs, likely behaviours, motivations and areas of development. This unbiased knowledge helps clients to hire, retain and develop the best people for their business, and drastically improves understanding, communication, and collaboration within teams. The Predictive Index, Behavioral AssessmentThe PI Behavioural Assessment is firmly rooted in – and supported by – science. As a PI Certified Partner Company, Predictive Advantage are therefore proud to share the exciting news that the Predictive Index Behavioral Assessment™ has recently been certified by third-party reviewers from DNV-GL, providers of assessment and risk management services according to third party standards across a variety of industries. …

Employee Experience – why you should embrace it

Have you ever considered the employee experience at your company? Most companies are well versed in the world of customer experience, because everyone knows that happy customers come back for more.

It’s easy to see why organisations around the world apply similar principles to all functions in their company. The tide has started to turn. Companies no longer put their customers first and their employees last.

It is now broadly accepted that if you look after your employees, they will look after your customers for you. A positive employee experience is likely to make your people feel more valued, motivated, and engaged, and they are therefore less likely to leave – another plus point for the overall productivity of your company! …

Manager as Coach Launch

Why do we need ‘Manager as Coach?

An opinion poll conducted by Gallup has found that 87% of employees worldwide are unmotivated, disengaged and under-performing.

In contrast, a highly engaged workforce is said to outperform their peers by 147% in earnings per share. The economic repercussions of having employees who do not feel committed to supporting a company’s goals are staggering.

Employee engagement – or rather the lack of – remains a key issue for employers. Nurturing your employees is a professional obligation, and not just for financial reasons. …

Gender or Talent Gap? The Example of the Working Mum

“Mums are formidable in the workplace, we need to hire more.”

As a working Mum, the title of Melissa Jun Rowley’s blog published in the Women in Leadership section of the Guardian caught my eye.

Even a cursory glance at the media confirms that gender related issues in the workplace continue to figure prominently and are highly charged. And with good cause, as these recent examples show:

The recent study on the gender pay gap in the UK by Robert Half, which found that women earn on average £300,000 less than men over their working life, caused a huge stir. The reasons given for this disparity are varied. They include the relative shortage of female professionals who progress into those senior roles that are linked with higher salaries.

People Management Lessons From The Ski Slope

Whilst recovering from my own first nerve-wrecking ski lesson, I was watching a ski instructor expertly guide his nervous new charges to the bottom of the short gentle slope. This scene made me ponder the question whether there are any similarities with leading – and being part of – a team in a business environment. Are there any people management lessons that we can take away from the ski slope?

Competency and Responsibility Ski instructors have to be assessed on their own ability and undergo extensive training before they are allowed to start teaching. Huge responsibility rests on their shoulders. Once in charge of a group of skiers, their role is one of patient nurture and control. They must keep their group safe at all times. This can be a daunting task. Skiers who are out control can be a danger to themselves and others. Sheer drops, rocks and other skiers are never far away and the trusting group has to rely on their instructors’ expertise and guidance. Thinking about our own teams, aren’t the best managers those who ensure that they themselves have the necessary skills and knowledge to lead their team with confidence? We rely on their competency. Don’t we also expect our team managers to keep us safe, encourage our personal development and steer us expertly through difficult patches? As team manager you may feel understandably laden down by the responsibility of this task. This surely becomes much easier when you can confidently draw on up-to-date and effective leadership skills and display the necessary competencies. …

Disregard Notions of Millennials: It’s Time to Stop Generalising Generations in the Workforce

Let me begin with a disclaimer: I am a Millennial. My views may or may not be representative of those of my peer group. Now we’ve got that out of the way, I would like to discuss the incredibly problematic generalisation of generations in the workplace.

People love to lump other people into easily definable groups; particularly in the working world. As humans are so utterly complex, it is perhaps comforting to think that we can manage large groups of them in the same way, rather than take on the seemingly mammoth task of tuning into individuals, each with their own characteristics and needs.

This is where the problems begin: Once we start to assume certain attributes according to factors such as age, we risk completely misjudging and ultimately alienating members of the workforce.

The Importance of Hiring the Right People to Promote Innovation

There’s no doubt about it: the global marketplace is more fiercely competitive than ever before and most successful entrepreneurs and business owners agree that the old adage has never been more poignant: “Innovate or die”.

Innovation is crucial if you’re aiming to grow your market share or you’re focused on staying at the pinnacle of your industry in terms of new products or forward-thinking business models. …

Stupidly Simple HR Strategies To Get Your Firm On Next Year’s Great Place To Work List

There’s something about walking into a workplace where you know people are happy to be there, don’t you think?

The air smells cleaner, the coffee tastes smoother and the people seem to smile at anything and everything, right? The photocopier works every time, the computers never go down, and the CEO hands out cash bonuses every Friday evening from his own wallet. …