Human Capital

Find that missing piece - recruitment

Will your job description help you find that missing piece?

The hiring process can be challenging. There are numerous things to take into consideration when you are looking for a new employee: budget, time frame, essential skills and experience, cultural fit. The list goes on.

However, recruitment should be celebrated. After all, if you are expanding your team your company is growing!

One of the first steps when recruiting is to decide on exactly who you are looking for and to create a compelling job description.

Simple enough right? Not necessarily.

The job advert will represent your company and your hiring needs. A well-written job advert – with a focus on the required behavioural characteristics – will attract the right applicants.

If your advert is not clearly targeted, you may have wasted your time, or it may lead to the wrong hire. Hiring mistakes are costly!

Employee Experience – why you should embrace it

Have you ever considered the employee experience at your company? Most companies are well versed in the world of customer experience, because everyone knows that happy customers come back for more.

It’s easy to see why organisations around the world apply similar principles to all functions in their company. The tide has started to turn. Companies no longer put their customers first and their employees last.

It is now broadly accepted that if you look after your employees, they will look after your customers for you. A positive employee experience is likely to make your people feel more valued, motivated, and engaged, and they are therefore less likely to leave – another plus point for the overall productivity of your company! …

What does Manager as Coach actually mean?

Maybe your organisation already encourages you as a manager to incorporate coaching your team members into your daily routine? Do you find it difficult to buy into this?

One of the most frequent objections from managers comes from being unsure what coaching really means and what is expected.

Although the story has been told many times before, the origin of the word coach is a good starting point to try and clarify things a little.

Coach in the sense of a closed horse-drawn carriage began to be widely used across Europe in the 16th century.

It originated in a small Hungarian village called Kocs where an unknown carriage maker had designed and built the most comfortable carriage known at that time. This was called koczi szeter (approx. wagon of Kocs) which was shortened to koczi.

As the invention of this new vehicle spread throughout Europe, the name was adapted to Kutsche in German, coche in French, and coach in English.

“That is all very interesting”, I hear you say, “but how does this relate to the term coach used in the business sense today?” …

Manager as Coach Launch

Why do we need ‘Manager as Coach?

An opinion poll conducted by Gallup has found that 87% of employees worldwide are unmotivated, disengaged and under-performing.

In contrast, a highly engaged workforce is said to outperform their peers by 147% in earnings per share. The economic repercussions of having employees who do not feel committed to supporting a company’s goals are staggering.

Employee engagement – or rather the lack of – remains a key issue for employers. Nurturing your employees is a professional obligation, and not just for financial reasons. …

How to manage remote staff

Virtual Teams Part 2: How to Manage Remote Employees

Do you have a strategy for managing virtual teams?

The trends, motivations and statistics behind the rise in remote working in our previous blog highlighted why thinking about remote working is an important business consideration. In addition, we find ourselves in the midst of a global pandemic.

As a manager, you will therefore be faced with the challenges that come with managing telecommuting workers and teams. Finding a starting point to a workable management strategy in this context can be daunting.

Working from home – even some of the time – is not naturally suited to everyone. It requires discipline and organisation. Employees working remotely have to be happy in their own company, able to use their own initiative, prioritise and be fully aware of their abilities and limitations. Having the right personality is a prerogative to remaining motivated and being successful in those circumstances.

Employee wellbeing

The Link Between Employee Wellbeing, Engagement and Absence

Employee wellbeing, engagement and workplace absence are intrinsically linked

Employee absence is a significant cost for many organisations. An estimated 141.4 million working days were lost because of sickness or injury in the UK in 2018, the equivalent to 4.4 days per worker. Unsurprisingly, the working world is now desperately trying to find out how to address this because of the huge impact that absenteeism has on productivity. At the same time, organisations have a duty of care to their staff.

The Labour Force Survey results show that approximately 10 million days were lost to stress, anxiety or depression, and statistics show that these figures are worsening year on year. Stress at work, leading to long-term absence, has more than doubled since the 1990s, yet only a third of employees receive any support to manage workplace stress.

This is bad news for business. Many organisations are now turning to wellbeing programs in an attempt to combat the ever worsening stress levels, but it has been suggested that for some companies, this is simply a move to tick a box as opposed to a reaction to genuine concern or understanding. The CIPD suggests that the majority of employers are more reactive than proactive in their approach to wellbeing (61 per cent), responding to persistent problems rather than predicting what health and wellbeing factors might impact the workforce in future.

Leadership lessons from the ski slope

People Management Lessons From The Ski Slope

Whilst recovering from my own first nerve-wrecking ski lesson, I was watching a ski instructor expertly guide his nervous new charges to the bottom of the short gentle slope. This scene made me ponder the question whether there are any similarities with leading – and being part of – a team in a business environment. Are there any people management lessons that we can take away from the ski slope?

Disregard Notions of Millennials: It’s Time to Stop Generalising Generations in the Workforce

Let me begin with a disclaimer: I am a Millennial. My views may or may not be representative of those of my peer group. Now we’ve got that out of the way, I would like to discuss the incredibly problematic generalisation of generations in the workplace.

People love to lump other people into easily definable groups; particularly in the working world. As humans are so utterly complex, it is perhaps comforting to think that we can manage large groups of them in the same way, rather than take on the seemingly mammoth task of tuning into individuals, each with their own behavioral characteristics and needs.

This is where the problems begin: Once we start to assume certain attributes according to factors such as age, we risk completely misjudging and ultimately alienating members of the workforce.

hire based on instinct

Do you hire based on instinct or impulse?

Hiring new employees is hard. Finding the most suitable employees for an organisation is even harder. The American Management Consultant Peter Drucker famously said that “33% of staffing decisions are bad, 33% are acceptable, and 33% are ok”.

So, why is hiring new employees so difficult?

You may be the type of manager who is simply too impatient to bide your time and wait for a game-changing candidate? Do you hire impulsively with a focus on simply retaining the headcount?

Unhappy employees - it could be you

Unhappy Employees? 3 Questions To Ask Yourself

Are you wondering what you can do about disengaged and unhappy employees? Good news! You’re not alone: 87 percent of organisations across the world cite company culture and employee engagement as their top challenges. The bad news is, with more than 71% of employees across the world not fully engaged, it can feel like something of an uphill battle when you’re trying to make a difference.