Human Capital

People Management Lessons From The Ski Slope

Whilst recovering from my own first nerve-wrecking ski lesson, I was watching a ski instructor expertly guide his nervous new charges to the bottom of the short gentle slope. This scene made me ponder the question whether there are any similarities with leading – and being part of – a team in a business environment. Are there any people management lessons that we can take away from the ski slope?

Competency and Responsibility

Ski instructors have to be assessed on their own ability and undergo extensive training before they are allowed to start teaching. Huge responsibility rests on their shoulders. Once in charge of a group of skiers, their role is one of patient nurture and control. They must keep their group safe at all times. This can be a daunting task. Skiers who are out of control can be a danger to themselves and others. Sheer drops, rocks and other skiers are never far away and the trusting group has to rely on their instructors

Talent Pipeline

Does Your Talent Pipeline Have a Leak that Needs Fixing?

Like an increasing number of managers or HR professionals, you might be discovering the growing importance of developing a truly watertight talent pipeline, and how this can positively impact on the long-term future of your company and your workforce.

Developing a talent pipeline involves a company creating a flow (usually involving a database and extremely good relationship-building skills) of interesting, relevant and qualified candidates who could be of benefit to the future hiring needs of a firm.

It also means creating a process for attracting, identifying and developing employees and teams, as well as having an effective leadership succession plan in place.

By having a database of potential employees, you

Unhappy employees - it could be you

Unhappy Employees? 3 Questions To Ask Yourself

Are you wondering what you can do about disengaged and unhappy employees? Good news! You’re not alone: 87 percent of organisations across the world cite company culture and employee engagement as their top challenges. The bad news is, with more than 71% of employees across the world not fully engaged, it can feel like something of an uphill battle when you’re trying to make a difference.

Fortunately, one of the first things that you can do is very simple (if a little uncomfortable): Start by looking at yourself as a leader, and ask a few probing questions…

So here goes:

1. Do you think you’re a good listener?

A lot of us believe ourselves to be GREAT listeners, when in fact we are just good at hearing what people are saying to us, then responding in a vaguely appropriate manner whilst simultaneously splitting our attention between five other things.

‘But that means I’m good at multi-tasking!’ I hear you say. Not quite. It means that your employees are trying to communicate with you, and you are not giving them the response or thought that they really need. Next time someone comes to talk to you, try to focus on what they are saying, and think before you respond; they will feel more valued, and you will have a better idea of what is going on around you!

2. Are you in control, or just controlling?

Delegation. Everyone shouts about this, time and time again, but have you ever truly taken it in? Try to remember that you have employed your people for their various talents, and these are more than likely going to be talents that you do not possess yourself; at least not to the same degree that they have trained for.

Micromanaging your employees will only irritate them and cause you more hassle. Let your teams do their jobs, and have a little faith. With more autonomy, you will be astounded at what they can do.

3. How often do you say thank you?

Gratitude costs nothing – A clich

How To Bring More Creativity Into Your Business

The Oxford Dictionary defines creativity as relating to or involving the use of the imagination or original ideas to create something.

In a nutshell, creativity could be seen simply as the ability to give life to new ideas and concepts and discover fresh approaches to solving a problem.

Applying this concept to an organisational context, creative employees might have the ability to think outside the box and to look at a challenging situation with a fresh and open-minded view, or they may have the natural drive to turn problems into opportunities.

Innovation can be a welcome by-product of creativity, but the solutions or ideas offered in this way do not necessarily have to be original. The idea of a jigsaw, where the pieces can simply be re-arranged to make a completely new picture, springs to mind.

Against this background – and in the current competitive economic climate – creativity must be seen as an essential characteristic of your workforce.

After all, it’s the ability to use an innovative approach and solve problems in new creative ways that gives your organisation the edge and differentiates it from your competition.

For this reason, it’s imperative that you